Importance of fat in diet

By | July 19, 2020

importance of fat in diet

A significant part of this review is dedicated to the current advances in nutrition science on the relation between dietary fat consumption and health outcomes, including obesity and cardiovascular disease. For easier understanding of the current document, written for a somewhat more advanced reader, it may be worthwhile to first read Facts on Fats: The Basics. Facts on Fats: The Basics describes the role of fats in taste perception and the importance of fats in a number of food technology applications. From a nutritional point of view, dietary fats are important for several health related aspects and for optimal functioning of the human body. Dietary fats are not just a source of energy; they function as structural building blocks of the body, carry fat-soluble vitamins, are involved in vital physiological processes in the body, and are indispensable for a number of important biological functions including growth and development. The importance of dietary fats is explained in more detail below. Fats are a source of energy in the human diet, together with carbohydrates and proteins, the other two main macronutrients.

Victorian government portal for older people, with information about government and community services and programs. Type a minimum of three characters then press UP or DOWN on the keyboard to navigate the autocompleted search results. Foods and drinks contain nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. Some foods or drinks contain a large amount of one nutrient such as soft drink, which contains a large amount of sugar, or fried food, which contains a large amount of fat. Dietary fat fat in foods and drinks, is important for many body processes. For example, it helps move some vitamins around the body and helps with making hormones. There are four types of dietary fat — each one can have a different effect on our blood cholesterol levels. For this reason, it is recommended to replace food and drinks high in saturated and trans fats with alternatives that contain more polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fats. Each gram of fat contains twice the kilojoules energy of carbohydrate or protein. Because of this, if you have foods and drinks with too much dietary fat, it can be difficult to maintain a healthy weight. Fats can bring out flavour in foods, so consuming meals with small amounts of fat can make foods more enjoyable and can satisfy our hunger for longer.

Consumers are often confused about nutrition research findings and recommendations. As content experts, it is essential that nutrition scientists communicate effectively. A case-study of the history of dietary fat science and recommendations is presented, summarizing presentations from an Experimental Biology Symposium that addressed techniques for effective scientific communication and used the scientific discourse of public understanding of dietary fats and health as an example of challenges in scientific communication. Decades of dietary recommendations have focused on balancing calorie intake and energy expenditure and decreasing fat. Reducing saturated fat has been a cornerstone of dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease CVD risk reduction. However, evidence from observational studies and randomized clinical trials demonstrates that replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates, specifically refined, has no benefit on CVD risk, while substituting polyunsaturated fats for either saturated fat or carbohydrate reduces risk. A significant body of research supports the unique health benefits of dietary patterns and foods that contain plant and marine sources of unsaturated fats. Shifting dietary recommendations to focus on food-based dietary patterns would facilitate translation to the public and potentially remedy widespread misperceptions about what constitutes a healthful dietary pattern. The way consumers obtain nutrition information has changed substantially in the past two decades. Use of the internet and social media has grown rapidly, and these are now among the leading sources of information for health and wellness. Perhaps due to access to more information than ever, including conflicting information of uncertain and variable quality, many consumers are more confused than ever.

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